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Editorial: APAPPS gaining momentum

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Apparently a mutual understanding and concordance between Kabul and Islamabad for the promotion of solidarity and peace and the launch of reciprocal measures to fight terrorism is taking momentum. Unanimity has also been shaped for the enforcement of the flamboyant APAPPS construct which defines a path for both the states to set aside perennially acrimonious relations and conclude a trajectory to their unresolved strategic woes.

Haneef Atmar and his high-profile entourage in Islamabad meeting with Pakistan’s intelligence advisor, army chief and foreign ministry deputy this week finalized a decision to implement 66 commitments for peace and reconciliation under the much-touted APAPPS – an action plan which was coaxed into being during Pakistani Prime Minister Abbasi’s visit to Kabul back in April. This mutualism is a wise riposte and a diplomatic approach to the plot twist in the Afghan-Pak saga; alas it may not culminate in a substantial roadmap to resolve the conflict.

Afghanistan-Pakistan Action Plan for Peace and Solidarity could become as futile and fragmentary as any other treaties and settlements before if Pakistani government backtracks from its end of the bargain – as part of its adherence to strategic depth – and deceives naïve Afghan leadership. It is though potentially unwise to expect entente from a state largely inundated with anti-Afghanistan sentiments and overtly indoctrinated with such dangerous ideologies as militancy, military hegemony, interventionism, and large economic monopolism. These vivid factors coupled with obscure past experiences make the outcome of this unanimity quite predictable.

Not only has the incumbent government pursued reciprocity with disingenuous Pakistan, but the erstwhile leader too had chased a quid pro quo with Pakistan, but to no purpose. This has been a wide goose chase and an unattainable mission widely because of the fact that Pakistan is too deceitful to hold on to its promises and that Afghanistan is too strategically naïve and diplomatically feeble to manipulate Pakistan.

A vacuum of scrupulousness and integrity is felt in magnanimous proportions in the mutual deal that is shaping. Afghanistan is left with no option but to negotiate with a terror-sponsoring state because it has always believed in peaceful approaches to bring an end to the conflict. A peaceful Afghanistan is in the interests of Pakistan as well; because there is a mounting pressure on Pakistan from its allies to reconsider its militancy shenanigans and interventionist ambitions. Moreover, Afghanistan offers a potential market for Pakistan’s merchandise and the shortest transit route for its connectivity to the Central Asia.