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Editorial: Hope in education

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Attention for providing an educational environment for the schoolchildren has gained impetus ever before, especially in rural areas where the parents drawing attention to the value of education. Education is key to success, a light to end darkness, and a weapon to demolish poverty. Still we don’t have remarkable success story of getting back all the deprived children in classrooms, but the government and NGOs supportive to education doing best to make it possible. All the Afghan masses and tribal elders could help children get an education by convincing the suppressers whether it’s the parents, or the militant outfits. Sustaining education for all is an Islamic obligation to all. Seeking education is compulsory. But, it’s unfortunate to see when girls blemish from going to schools. Violence remains high and widespread. For many Afghan girls, going to schools by walking miles every day, considers everything because they see brighter future in it–and absolutely right on it. Education is a light that enfold darkness by enlightening the wisdom and attitude. But unfortunately, 3.5 million children are unschooled. In that figure according to UNICEF, seventy-five percent of them are girls that insecurity has major cause to it. In certain parts where there is relative peace, female enrollment seems higher than that of boys. Sadly, there are fewer places nationwide to have so-called peace. Plenty of schools closed because of raging violence. According to education ministry, 17,500 schools are across the country, but 1,075 remained shut last year. The south of the country, where violence has been relentless over the past decade, has been disproportionately affected by the school closures. It also undermines fragile gains in education for Afghan girls and boys. To preserve it, sometimes one must agree for something which is very hard to concur. Violence has become a daily reality, and elders have tried to figure out local arrangements to keep the door of education open. Some news says that Taliban militants want schools in their areas after local elders’ connotation.  Agreement made over reopening of schools under Taliban areas in upcoming spring. Nevertheless, this hope seems in vain as the Taliban insurgents already closed 39 girls and boys schools in Logar province. They warned to torch these schools if government forces try to reopen them—a direct hostility against education that has nothing to do with the war. They also acted against Islamic teachings, where the Holy Quran emphasizes on pursuing education and reading. Strive for education and providing suitable environment for the girls and boys to be in classrooms, is the Islamic obligation of everyone, including the Taliban. Before more deprivation, the Taliban militants have to reopen these schools rather take more steps to keep schools open considering education value in light of Islamic teachings.