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Editorial: UK Ambassador’s unorthodox remarks

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Afghanistan had been a nonaggressive, nonviolent, pro-democratic, multiracial and a calm nation and the world was at awe of it. That is history now. Now that calm country is no longer at peace. The country is now war-shattered, conflict-stricken, and politically, economically and socially challenged – where the political atmosphere is increasingly corrupted and people bleed inexorably. But its people are brave, resilient, fearless and hopeful, upon whom an unending war has been brought.

Restoring peace has become as elusive, mysterious and unattainable as ending the war. The nation of Afghanistan craves for peace, but they are under hegemony and under deliberate and unflinching interferences. In fact, the peace blues and a resulting chagrin are direct ramifications of interferences of outsiders. An example of direct foreign meddling is the disgraceful remarks of the British ambassador to Kabul who articulated that war and insecurity has become a part of lives of Afghans. Nicholas Kay also cast doubt at Afghanistan’s peace quest by saying that its leaders are engaged in a ‘political game’, referring to peace efforts. These remarks are insulting and degrading for the people of Afghanistan – who have been hemorrhaging to state-sponsoring terrorism.

If the Britain wants peace restored in Afghanistan, it has to up the pressure on its closest ally, Pakistan. It also should not mock Afghanistan and its people and demoralize its polity. They should also bear in mind that peace is not an illusion for Afghans and war has exhausted them. They want peace resuscitated and conflict stemmed.

The legacy of Britain’s involvement in Afghanistan is complex. The British imposed the de facto Durand Line on Afghanistan over a century ago and segregated its peoples; and they were at the helm of our foreign affairs and diplomatic relations during Amir Abdul Rahman Khan. It might be an overstatement to affirm that the British are sponsoring terrorism; but they are without doubt paying to keep the war going.

Painstaking and century-long experience dictates they cannot be trusted. Brits now are seen trying to pour salt on our wound and escalate an already prevailing political confusion; although they are pretending to be burying the hatchet and helping steer us through the trajectory of conflict.