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Editorial: Once again US B-52

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The US B-52 bombers have carried out a record-setting series of strikes in northern parts of the country and dropped 24 precision-guided munitions in order to destroy Taliban’s fighting positions, their revenue sources, training facilities and support networks. It comes at a time when the Russian enjoy to Kabul, Zamir Kabulov said earlier that a large number of militants have been roaming in northern areas of the country, but the Afghan and US forces were not taking action against them. In fact, the use of B-52, increases in number of US/NATO troops, redeployment of US forces from Iraq to Afghanistan is a part of the US President Donald Trump’s new strategy, based on offensives against terrorists and terror sponsor states. After bombing the Taliban’s opium and heroin facilities in Helmand last November, US military officials revealed the Trump administration has given military authority to take the fight to the enemy in new ways. “The new strategy highlights that this is a new war and it will be a game-changer,” Air Force Brig. Gen. Lance Bunch said at the time. Unfortunately, a large number of civilians have also lost their lives in various US air strikes across the country which sparked anger and criticism by the Afghan masses. The country’s politicians, civil society and tribal elders, especially former President Hamid Karzai has repeatedly urged the foreign forces to quit blind air strikes, resulting in civilian casualties and destroying private properties. The US military offensives against militants must be confined to specific targets of the various terror networks, plotting terrorism and destruction in Afghanistan in order to eliminate them all which need a comprehensive and result-oriented strategy. Any war strategy, whether it is new or old should reflect will and prior consultation with the Afghan people in order to escape any types of mishaps. However, Afghan-led political solution to the ongoing insurgency in our country should be prioritized, because the continuation of war is neither the solution to the problems of Afghanistan, nor of the US-led international community. Last year, the US dropped a large bomb called “Mother Of All Bombs” in eastern Nangarhar province, but did not yield any required outcomes. Afghanistan is still bleeding at the hands of terrorist groups who have safe sanctuaries and training centers outside the country. That’s why Afghan-led and Afghan-owned peace and reconciliation process should be given required chance, instead of warrior strategies. All stakeholders in the country must be taken on board and a wide-range political consensus and national unity is needed in a bid to establish durable peace and stability in the country and around the region. The US led international community should take the war where there are safe terror havens, outside Afghanistan.